Arnold Kling  

A Stanford Course Where A Means A

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A Means A, a bit more fleshed ... Liberating the New Commanding ...

Artificial Intelligence, to be taught in the fall by Sebastian Thrun and Peter Norvig. Although you will not get a Stanford certificate, the course promises a certificate that shows how you would have done on Stanford's grading curve.

Thanks to Alex Tabarrok for the pointer. Note also that Eli Dourado spotted this earlier, here.

I have a technical question about this course and the Khan Academy. Where do they get the tools to create a video in which you see writing on a blackboard, with a synch to audio? I would love to try that out. In the past, I have typed up outlines and attached audio files, but that is not nearly as engaging.

Also, Tim Worstall claims that the University of London already uses this sort of model. Commenters also pointed out that the College Board does some of this with its CLEP testing program. While I applaud these efforts, it seems to me closer to the AP model of "teach to the test" than to what I suggested, which is "test to what you teach," which I explain a bit more in the post where I sketched out A Means A. My claim is that we need flexible and adaptable courses. A system where the test is given and everyone has to teach to it will lack that adaptability. Still, there is much to be said for it. I am a fan of the AP program.


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COMMENTS (8 to date)
ChrisJ writes:

Tools used by the Khan academy:

"Camtasia Recorder ($200) + SmoothDraw3(Free) + a Wacom Bamboo Tablet ($80) on a PC. I used to use ScreenVideoRecorder($20) and Microsoft Paint (Free)."

http://www.khanacademy.org/frequently-asked-questions#equipment

Damien writes:

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=121978193

Camtasia + Smoothdraw + graphics tablet

Ironman writes:

Khan uses Microsoft Paint with screen recording software. See more here.

Jonathan Bechtel writes:

I think he uses Camtasia for his screencasts. I believe I read that somewhere, although I'm not sure where.

Anyways, here's the link to the program: Camtasia Studios

DCordeiro writes:

Stanford also has a very successful and accredited online high school.

http://epgy.stanford.edu/ohs

I'm talking to the administration about whether they will accept transfer credit for successful participation in this Stanford University AI course.

One of the many benefits of OHS is that it allows younger students to take a subset of Stanford courses in areas where they are more advanced.

Other unique attributes of the school include an international student body and a great sequence of core courses.

Lectures use a combination of video, VOIP and whiteboarding just like we do in global corporations. All of these lectures are recorded allowing a student to efficiently go back and review any course content.

Tom Myers writes:

It's on the FAQ, at http://www.khanacademy.org/about/faq where he says "I use Camtasia Recorder ($200) + SmoothDraw3(Free) + a Wacom Bamboo Tablet ($80) on a PC. I used to use ScreenVideoRecorder($20) and Microsoft Paint (Free). "

Noah Yetter writes:
...it seems to me closer to the AP model of "teach to the test" than to what I suggested, which is "test to what you teach,"...
These are equivalent. Ponder the long run equilibrium and you will understand why.
Matt McKnight writes:

CamStudio 2.0 is another free option on Windows if you don't want to spring for Camtasia.

http://camstudio.org/

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