Bryan Caplan  

My Future of Freedom Foundation Interview

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Bet on Terrorist Incident... Some thoughts on utilitarianis...
The Future of Freedom Foundation's Jacob Hornberger and Richard Ebeling interviewed me for their Youtube show.  Enjoy.






COMMENTS (3 to date)
jon writes:

From around 2:45 to 3:25 you mention the benefits of immigrant labor. Does this mean we can we expect an economic boom in Europe soon? I would guess that Sweden and Germany, in particular, have a banner year ahead.

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jon writes:

I have now learned that it is both common sense and common civility to put all comments in a single post:

  • From around 6:45 to 7:45 you mention that economically immigrants are either net zero, or "not much of a burden at all." Remind me again why this is such a good deal for us.

  • From around 8:55 to 9:45 you mention that we could restrict immigrant eligibility for government benefits. This reminds me of your so-called "key hole" solutions. Can you give some examples of actual key hole restrictions that exist now?
  • From around 11:00 to 11:20 you mention that African-Americans are "likely to use welfare." Just thought that should be quoted for posterity.
  • From around 20:00 to 20:15 you dismissively mention the Cologne assaults on New Years Eve. This, too, should be quoted for posterity.
  • And again, at around 30:55, you double down on the benefits of immigration. So let's make a bet. You like betting, right? Which European country will see the biggest boom from the recent immigration boom? Germany, Sweden? Obviously not Hungary! Make one of your public bets.
  • From around 31:30 you suggested that people wouldn't migrate to the US because "the rent is too damn high." How is that currently working out in Europe, where the rent is usually even higher than here?
  • A couple of interesting quotes from Bryan: 39:10 "if this had happened overnight, it would have been a disaster" but "in China they have internal immigration restrictions" 39:50 "I don't like to sugar coat things. I think that the things that people think about happening over a year or two years would happen over the course of twenty or thirty years."
  • From around 45:10, your friend on the bottom of the screen attempts to defend the idea that we have strictly enforced borders based on the fact that the south Texas courts are clogged with illegal immigration cases. Think that through - the south Texas courts are clogged with cases involving people who made it to south Texas illegally, and that proves how tight our border is?
kyle r writes:
From around 2:45 to 3:25 you mention the benefits of immigrant labor. Does this mean we can we expect an economic boom in Europe soon? I would guess that Sweden and Germany, in particular, have a banner year ahead.

Maybe not this year or the next, as immigrants are typically net takers at first, but with the proper investment in their skills and success in assimilation, they will surely add to the growth of the economy in the near to mid future. Germany should be viewing this population as a potential godsend considering their rapidly ageing and declining workforce population.

From around 6:45 to 7:45 you mention that economically immigrants are either net zero, or "not much of a burden at all." Remind me again why this is such a good deal for us.

Immigrants are much more entrepreneurial and self-sustaining than natives.

From around 11:00 to 11:20 you mention that African-Americans are "likely to use welfare." Just thought that should be quoted for posterity.

Take a look at the census data and you will see 40+% of blacks participate in means tested government programs. So, statistically speaking, they are likely to use welfare.

From around 20:00 to 20:15 you dismissively mention the Cologne assaults on New Years Eve. This, too, should be quoted for posterity.

How is this dismissive? Denying whole groups of people refuge due to the acts of a few (who were reportedly North African, not Syrian, Iraqi, or Afghani) would be a grave miscarriage of justice. Your response just makes it seem like you would only champion women's rights when it supports your xenophobia.

And again, at around 30:55, you double down on the benefits of immigration. So let's make a bet. You like betting, right? Which European country will see the biggest boom from the recent immigration boom? Germany, Sweden? Obviously not Hungary! Make one of your public bets.

Depending on how well they seize the opportunity, Germany should see the greatest benefit. They are quickly letting the opportunity slip through their fingers, some of which can blamed on the xenophobia to the east (Hungary and Poland).

From around 31:30 you suggested that people wouldn't migrate to the US because "the rent is too damn high." How is that currently working out in Europe, where the rent is usually even higher than here?

Rents are high are in the UK (where refugees are not being admitted) and Scandinavia. But in Eastern and Southern Europe the cost of living is much more affordable than most places in the United States, especially cities with large immigrant populations, like New York, DC, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco. Unfortunately, these European countries are the most hostile to accepting refugees.

From around 45:10, your friend on the bottom of the screen attempts to defend the idea that we have strictly enforced borders based on the fact that the south Texas courts are clogged with illegal immigration cases. Think that through - the south Texas courts are clogged with cases involving people who made it to south Texas illegally, and that proves how tight our border is?

These are not mutually exclusive events. A strictly enforced boarder is not necessarily a tight boarder. All this means is instead of letting people march right through and into the United States to enjoy a happy life, boarder agents round these people up, send them to court, and get them deported back to their home country.


Hope this helps. Everyone deserves a chance at a happy life of their own choosing. Unfortunately, a fair portion of the Earth's population is denied this opportunity. Freer, more open immigration policies would help give more people this chance.

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