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Power corrupts...

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Johnson Bet... Fama versus Thaler...

I remain troubled by much of the rhetoric in this US election season... The vitriol often seems to exclude economics. Fortunately, our own Scott Sumner has done some analysis. Here's his take on the economic prospects of a Clinton or Trump presidency. Who's behind the candidates' economics? Bloomberg says this unlikely scholar is the man behind Trump's take on China. But perhaps the lack of attention to economics is an advantage, at least for the Democrats. Virginia Postrel says the Dems have a unique opportunity to apply economic dynamism, but will they seize it? As always, it's wise to remember what leaders can and cannot do about the state of the economy.

The "first seven jobs" craze has filled my Facebook feed this week, and it's been fun to see what my friends have done in the past...But I don't think any of them can match these "dream jobs." It's good to see folks minding their comparative advantage...

Shakespeare_1623_759.jpg Shakespeare, Lord Acton, and Adam Smith...Now that's a trifecta! Don't miss the latest Liberty Matters conversation at our sister site, The Online Library of Liberty this month. In his lead essay, John Alvis argues that Shakespeare's plays have a lot to teach us about the exercise of power and its effects on liberty and responsibility. Contributors Sarah Skwire, David Urban, and Michael Zuckert reply.

P.S. Don't miss this week's EconTalk episode with Quora founder Adam D'Angelo, either. In fact, why not head over and ask- or answer- a question today! (And look for our next EconTalk Extra tomorrow!)


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COMMENTS (1 to date)
R Richard Schweitzer writes:

As it is not money but love of money that is the "root of all evil," it is not power that corrupts it is the love of power that corrupts, and the love of absolute power that "corrupts absolutely"

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