Scott Sumner  

Swift and Stevenson on economics

PRINT
A correction on a previous pos... Walter Block's Reductio ad Abs...

In a recent post, I argued that people don't understand what's going on in the world because they learn through stories, not statistics. I recently came across the following in an essay written by Robert Louis Stevenson:

Labouring mankind had in the last years, and throughout Great Britain, sustained a prolonged and crushing series of defeats. I had heard vaguely of these reverses; of whole streets of houses standing deserted by the Tyne, the cellar-doors broken and removed for firewood; of homeless men loitering at the street-corners of Glasgow with their chests beside them; of closed factories, useless strikes, and starving girls. But I had never taken them home to me or represented these distresses livingly to my imagination.

A turn of the market may be a calamity as disastrous as the French retreat from Moscow; but it hardly lends itself to lively treatment, and makes a trifling figure in the morning papers. We may struggle as we please, we are not born economists. The individual is more affecting than the mass. It is by the scenic accidents, and the appeal to the carnal eye, that for the most part we grasp the significance of tragedies.


I also finally got around to reading Gulliver's Travels (better late than never), which is full of interesting tidbits. Here is the King of Brobdingnag:

That whoever could make two ears of corn, or two blades of grass, to grow upon a spot of ground where only one grew before, would deserve better of mankind, and do more essential service to his country, than the whole race of politicians put together.

Imagine a kingdom where Norman Borlaug was more famous than Kennedy or Reagan.

And it has this prescient description of China's Great Leap Forward:

The sum of his discourse was to this effect: "That about forty years ago, certain persons went up to Laputa, either upon business or diversion, and, after five months continuance, came back with a very little smattering in mathematics, but full of volatile spirits acquired in that airy region: that these persons, upon their return, began to dislike the management of every thing below, and fell into schemes of putting all arts, sciences, languages, and mechanics, upon a new foot. To this end, they procured a royal patent for erecting an academy of projectors in Lagado; and the humour prevailed so strongly among the people, that there is not a town of any consequence in the kingdom without such an academy. In these colleges the professors contrive new rules and methods of agriculture and building, and new instruments, and tools for all trades and manufactures; whereby, as they undertake, one man shall do the work of ten; a palace may be built in a week, of materials so durable as to last for ever without repairing. All the fruits of the earth shall come to maturity at whatever season we think fit to choose, and increase a hundred fold more than they do at present; with innumerable other happy proposals. The only inconvenience is, that none of these projects are yet brought to perfection; and in the mean time, the whole country lies miserably waste, the houses in ruins, and the people without food or clothes. By all which, instead of being discouraged, they are fifty times more violently bent upon prosecuting their schemes, driven equally on by hope and despair: that as for himself, being not of an enterprising spirit, he was content to go on in the old forms, to live in the houses his ancestors had built, and act as they did, in every part of life, without innovation: that some few other persons of quality and gentry had done the same, but were looked on with an eye of contempt and ill-will, as enemies to art, ignorant, and ill common-wealth's men, preferring their own ease and sloth before the general improvement of their country."
Also in Laputa:
Most of them, and especially those who deal in the astronomical part, have great faith in judicial astrology, although they are ashamed to own it publicly. But what I chiefly admired, and thought altogether unaccountable, was the strong disposition I observed in them towards news and politics, perpetually inquiring into public affairs, giving their judgments in matters of state, and passionately disputing every inch of a party opinion. I have indeed observed the same disposition among most of the mathematicians I have known in Europe, although I could never discover the least analogy between the two sciences; unless those people suppose, that because the smallest circle has as many degrees as the largest, therefore the regulation and management of the world require no more abilities than the handling and turning of a globe; but I rather take this quality to spring from a very common infirmity of human nature, inclining us to be most curious and conceited in matters where we have least concern, and for which we are least adapted by study or nature.

Screen Shot 2017-07-08 at 10.21.46 PM.png


Comments and Sharing






COMMENTS (2 to date)
Alan Goldhammer writes:

Two great fiction economics books for consideration. Anthony Trollope's "The Way We Live Now," that was inspired by the 1870's financial scandals; and William Gaddis's "J R," about an 11 year old who creates a paper fortune in stocks (Louis Auchincloss said this novel was worth of Swift). Be forewarned that the Gaddis book is almost exclusively written in dialogue and it takes a while to get adjusted to the rhythm (it was the winner of the National Book Award for Fiction).

Shane L writes:

Stevenson's Treasure Island was a childhood favourite of mine so I'm pleased to see he had wisdom in economic matters too!

I was referencing Treasure Island lately in a discussion about the large number of tv dramas and movies that feature high-level conspiracies organised by a small group of evil geniuses. I noted that Stevenson's pirates conspired against the ship, but they were disorganised and fairly decentralised. Pirates fell on each other in drunken brawls. Their submission to the authority of their captain was contingent on his success and they had a primitive democratic institution to call him to account. In other words, there was no evil genius pulling strings, simply loosely-aligned individuals with lots of individual interests pulling in different directions. Jim and Ben Gunn also acted at odds with their sides (as does Bilbo in The Hobbit). I liked this decentralised vision of violent conflict in Stevenson and thought it more interesting than the repeated narratives of high conspiracy in the likes of Sherlock, The Sentinel and Spectre.

POST A COMMENT




Return to top