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The Best of Econlib: 2017 (cont.)

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Economic Freedom via Freedom o... The Case Against Education<...

Democracy in Chains.jpg We couldn't leave EconLog out of our year-end reflections, now could we? We'll share our EconTalk listener survey results soon... In the meantime, here's a look at the most-read EconLog posts of 2017. Here's to another great year of continuing conversation!


10. Scott Sumner, Saving, cost control, and infrastructure... Sumner argues there are more effective ways to get more infrastructure than increasing federal spending...

9. Scott Sumner. A penny for your thoughts... Should the penny be abolished? How about larger coins, or even bills? Sumner shares his thoughts..

8. Scott Sumner, How can there be a shortage of construction workers? Sumner explores why the construction labor market appears to remain in disequilibrium.

7. Bryan Caplan, Hard Questions About the Protestant Reformation... On its 500th Anniversary, Caplan (and later his eldest sons) asks some tough questions.

6. Bryan Caplan, Reply to Noah on The Case Against Education...Caplan's new book has been getting lots of media attention, including this piece in The Atlantic. Here he replies to the criticisms of Noah Smith.

5. Scott Sumner, Fifty Years Ago...Sumner reflects on Chinese reactions to capitalism over the years, focusing on rhetoric over policy.

4. Bryan Caplan, Minimally Convincing...Caplan looked at the disemployment effects of the minimum wage, but do they help or hinder opponents of legislated minimum wages?

3. Bryan Caplan, Why Libertarians Should Oppose the Universal Basic Income...A popular topic across Econlib last year, Caplan lays out why you might be opposed.

2. David Henderson, Nancy MacLean's Distortion of James Buchanan's Statement...One of many entries in the saga of out-of-context quotes. (Also includes a link to EconTalk host Russ Roberts's equally popular Medium post on MacLean, one of the few to which she responded.)

1. Bryan Caplan, IQ With Conscience...An "IQ realist, all the way, Caplan quibbles with some of the policy conclusions of his fellows.



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