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David Henderson: March 2017

An Author Archive by Month (19 entries)

Henderson on NAFTA and Mercantilism

International Trade
David Henderson
Those statements are true. But they leave out something just as important: If NAFTA were eliminated, not just U.S. tariffs and restrictions on Canadian exports, but also Canada's tariffs and restrictions on Canada's imports would rise. So even if... MORE

Hooper and Henderson Do Want the FDA Another Way

Economics of Health Care
David Henderson
In a comment on my co-blogger Alberto Mingardi's post on the FDA, AlanG writes: FDA has to evaluate new drugs based on their risk/benefit profile. Large clinical trials of new vaccines destined to be administered to healthy children are required... MORE

My thesis is as follows: Gains from exchange contain the seeds of their own expansion. When economists and other intellectuals provide evidence that deregulation increases gains from exchange, either these intellectuals, bureaucrats, or others often draw on this evidence to... MORE

The turning point came in 1758. The Philadelphia Yearly Meeting [of Quakers] recorded a "unanimous concern" against "the practice of importing, buying, selling, or keeping slaves for term of life." This was the first success for the cause of abolition... MORE

Restless Judge Posner

Law and Economics
David Henderson
Probably the best-known current federal judge who is not a Supreme Court justice is Richard Posner. He has been a judge on the 7th Circuit since 1981. Posner is known for his judicial decisions, his crystal-clear writing style in... MORE

DeLong on Gains from International Trade

International Trade
David Henderson
UC Berkeley economist Brad DeLong has written one of the best short pieces on the gains from international trade. His post is titled "Are There Benefits from Free Trade?: DeLong FAQ." He writes: Well, typically and roughly, the average import... MORE

Henderson on the John Batchelor Show

Economics of Health Care
David Henderson
Here's the audio from my interview yesterday. The interview was prompted by this blog post.... MORE

Tyler Cowen is a Semi-Persuasive Futurist

Books: Reviews and Suggested Readings
David Henderson
My review of Tyler Cowen's latest book, The Complacent Class, is now out in the pages of Regulation. It's titled "Tyler Cowen: Semi-Persuasive Futurist." This excerpt gives a flavor of what I liked and disliked: Cowen nails the causes and... MORE

Thoughts on the Republican Health Insurance Reform

Economics of Health Care
David Henderson
I've held back on commenting in a big-picture sense on the Republicans' plan for repealing and replacing Obamacare. I've found comments by Megan McArdle, Peter Suderman, co-blogger Scott Sumner, and Steven Landsburg, among others, useful. They've tended to focus on... MORE

When You Lose Something You Don't Want, Is that Really a Loss?

Economics of Health Care
David Henderson
One of the big findings in the recent Congressional Budget Office (CBO) report on the Republican health proposal is that by 2018, about 14 million people who would have had health insurance will lose it. That sounds bad, right? But... MORE

This is Misleading CNN--and CBO

Fiscal Policy
David Henderson
On the way home from work this evening, I heard an incorrect statement of the latest CBO report's findings on the Republican-proposed health care bill. (I'll have more to say about the bill in a future post; I'm still digesting... MORE

The Joys of Yiddish and Economics

Price Controls
David Henderson
George Mason University economist Dan Klein has a fun paper, about to be published in the Independent Review, titled "The Joys of Yiddish and Economics." Dan writes: In The Joys of Yiddish, Rosten's method is to introduce each Yiddish term,... MORE

Co-blogger Scott Sumner advocates keeping a tax on medical devices. His reason: the medical devices tax was far smaller than the subsidy on medical devices, which is enormous. (Subsidies include Medicare, Medicaid, tax deductibility of insurance, etc.) But normally when... MORE

Above is a picture of the late Bill Niskanen. Karl Smith would not pass an Ideological Turing Test. Karl Smith of the Niskanen Institute recently wrote a piece titled "Some Conservative Arguments against the Border Adjustment Tax are Pretty... MORE

Opting Out of Social Security

Social Security
David Henderson
My suggestion is that the government, before making any major changes to the Social Security formulas, first allow Americans to opt out of the system, thereby avoiding any future payroll taxes but also forfeiting any accrued benefits. However, if... MORE

East Side Sushi Celebrates Labor Market

Labor Market
David Henderson
My wife and I saw a very good movie on HBO last night: East Side Sushi. On a scale of 1 to 10, I would give it at least an 8. As well as being first-rate drama, with a... MORE

Three Problems with Chetty's Study of Income Mobility

Income Distribution
David Henderson
Stanford University economist Raj Chetty claims that the American dream is fading. He may well be right, but his data on which he bases that judgment don't make his case. Alan Reynolds points this out well in a recent Cato... MORE

The Perverse Effects of the Pre-Existing Condition Pricing Ban

Economics of Health Care
David Henderson
Health economist John C. Goodman once said, at a talk I attended when Obamacare was being debated, "Would you want to be a patron of a restaurant that didn't want you as a customer?" He was getting at the fact... MORE

Stop Winning Arguments

Behavioral Economics and Rationality
David Henderson
The Institute for Humane Studies asked me to write a piece on persuasion. My post at Learn Liberty, "If you want to persuade people, stop 'winning' arguments" is the result. Normally, I don't like it when editors substitute their title... MORE

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